U.S. Veterans Health Administration

2009 Pain Management Directive 2009-053

In 2009, the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) adopted "Standards of Pain Management" to improve the organization and delivery of integrated pain care throughout the VHA.  The Directive emphasizes the importance of “stepped, consultative care,” that includes ensuring primary care providers have access to specialists to help effectively evaluate and manage complex cases.  Under the heading “Clinician Competence and Expertise in Pain Management,” the Directive recommends that Pain Medicine specialists obtain and maintain one or more of the following certifications:  Pain Medicine specialty board certification by the American Board of Pain Medicine (ABPM) or subspecialty board certification in Pain Medicine or Hospice and Palliative Care Medicine by one of several American Board of Medical Specialty (ABMS) Boards.


Alabama

Alabama’s “Pain Management Act” was enacted to empower the Alabama Board of Medical Examiners with broad authority to regulate physicians who provide pain management services in the state.  Among the provisions, the Act requires physicians providing pain management services to register with the BME and access the Alabama Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP).  The Act also requires that pain management services be provided in a “practice location” that meets the Act’s standards relating to ownership and operation.  Every practice location must certify that it is under the direction of a medical director who meets the Act’s training requirements, which include specialty certification in pain medicine by the ABMS, AOA and Board certification by the ABPM.

Act 2013-257; Article 11, Chapter 24, Title 34-24-100


Alaska

To ABPM's knowledge, Alaska currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Alaska, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Arizona

Under the FAQ "what does board certification mean?", the Arizona Medical Board defines board certification as being certified by an ABMS board.

http://www.azmd.gov/FAQ/LicensingPhysicians.aspx

If you have any contacts that you believe can be be of assistance in persuading this state to reconsider expanding this definition, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Arkansas

To ABPM's knowledge, Arkansas currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Arkansas, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


California

California’s Business and Professions code prohibits physicians from advertising that they are board-certified unless they are certified by an ABMS member specialty board, a specialty board with an ACGME accredited postgraduate training program or “a specialty board with “equivalent” requirements approved by the Medical Board of California’s Licensing Program.”  The Medical Board has approved the following four specialty boards:

  • American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (1995)
  • American Board of Pain Medicine (1996)
  • American Board of Sleep Medicine (1998)
  • American Board of Spine Surgery (2002)

CA Business and Professions Code, §651(h)(5)(A) & (B)

http://www.mbc.ca.gov/Licensees/Specialty_Board_Advertising.aspx 


Colorado

To ABPM's knowledge, Colorado currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Colorado, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Connecticut

To ABPM's knowledge, Connecticut currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Connecticut, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Delaware

To ABPM's knowledge, Delaware currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Delaware, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Florida

Florida’s Board of Medicine formally recognizes ABPM as a specialty board, and authorizes ABPM Pain Medicine Diplomates to advertise as specialists in Florida.

Florida Board of Medicine Rule 64B8-11.001 – Advertising

Pursuant to FL Statute 456.44, "'Board-certified pain management physician' means a physician who possesses board certification in pain medicine by the American Board of Pain Medicine, board certification by the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians, or board certification or sub-certification in pain management by a specialty board recognized by the American Association of Physician Specialists or an osteopathic physician who holds a certificate in Pain Management by the American Osteopathic Association.”

FL Statutes 456.44  – Controlled substance prescribing law


Georgia

The Georgia pain management protocol states: the Georgia Composite Medical Board “recognizes certifications in pain medicine or palliative medicine by the American Board of Medical Specialties or the American Osteopathic Association, the American Board of Pain Medicine and the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians.”

Any physician who prescribes Schedule II or III substances for chronic pain for greater than 50% of that physician’s annual patient population must document competence to the Board through certification or eligibility for certification in pain management or palliative medicine as approved by the Georgia Composite Medical Board.  ABPM is an approved board.

Georgia Rule 360-3-.06 – Pain Management Protocol


Hawaii

To ABPM's knowledge, Hawaii currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Hawaii, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Idaho

To ABPM's knowledge, Idaho currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Idaho, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Illinois

To ABPM's knowledge, Illinois currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Illinois, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Indiana

While Indiana does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining  standards for pain clinics, it does issue the following statement on use of the term "board certified".

844 IAC 5-2-22 Use of term, "board certified"

Sec. 22. A practitioner shall not represent in any manner that he or she is "board certified" or use any similar words or phrase calculated to convey the same unless the practitioner states by which board he/she is certified and the specific field or area of certification.


Iowa

To ABPM's knowledge, Iowa currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Iowa, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Kansas

To ABPM's knowledge, Kansas currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Kansas, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Kentucky

The regulation details Kentucky’s requirements for owning pain management facilities.  The regulation imposes strict requirements for physician-owners or physician owner-designees who will actively practice medicine in the facility, to include an attestation that demonstrates current ABMS or AOA subspecialty certification in either pain management or hospice and palliative medicine or through certification by the American Board of Pain Medicine of American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians.

ABPM is included in these regulations, as a pathway to qualify physicians to practice pain medicine in Kentucky.

201 KAR 9:250E - Registration and Oversight of Pain Management Facilities


Louisiana

The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, Office of the Secretary, Bureau of Health Services Financing has adopted LAC 48:I.Chapter 78 - Pain Management Clinic - Licensing Standards.  As part of these provisions, they define a pain specialist as follows:

Pain Specialist—a physician, licensed in Louisiana, with a certification in the subspecialty of pain management by a member board of the American Boards of Medical Specialties.

http://new.dhh.louisiana.gov/assets/medicaid/hss/docs/PMC/PAINMGT.doc

If you have any contacts that you believe can be be of assistance in persuading this state to reconsider expanding this definition, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Maine

To ABPM's knowledge, Maine currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Maine, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Maryland

Maryland defines "board-certified" as follows:

9) “Board-certified” means the physician is certified by a public or private board, including a multidisciplinary board, and the certifying board is:

(a) A member of ABMS; 
(b) An AOA certifying board; 
(c) The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada; or 
(d) The College of Family Physicians of Canada.

http://www.dsd.state.md.us/comar/comarhtml/10/10.32.01.02.htm

If you have any contacts that you believe can be be of assistance in persuading this state to reconsider expanding this definition, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Massachusetts

To ABPM's knowledge, Massachusetts currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Massachusetts, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Minnesota

To ABPM's knowledge, Minnesota currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Minnesota, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Michigan

Pain and Symptom Management Advisory Committee Report includes ABPM as "a national professional organization approved by the department of Consumer and Industry Services"

PAIN and SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORT


Mississippi

Per Miss. Code Ann. §73-43-11 (1972, as amended).
Rule 1.15 Pain Management Clinics

8. Training Requirements for All Physicians Practicing in Pain Management Clinics. Effective July 1, 2014, physicians who have not met the qualifications set forth in the subsections (1) through (5) below, shall have successfully completed a pain residency fellowship or a pain medicine residency that is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) or the American Osteopathic Assocation (AOA). All physicians prescribing or dispensing controlled substance medications in pain management clinics registered by the Board must meet one (1) of the following qualifications:

  1. board certification by a specialty board recognized by the American board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) or the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) and hold a subspecialty certification in pain medicine;
  2. board certification by a specialty board recognized by the American Osteopathic Assocation Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists in pain management;
  3. board certification in pain medicine by the American Board of Pain Medicine (ABPM);
  4. successful completion of a residency program in physical medicine and rehabilitation, anesthesiology, neurology, neurosurgery, or psychiatry and approved by the ACGME or the AOA; or
  5. successful completion of 100 hours of in-person, live participatory AMA or AOA Category 1 courses in pain management. Upon completion of the 100 hours of CME, physicians must also document completion of 15 hours of live lecture format, Category 1 CME in pain management for every year the physician is practicing pain management.
Please click here to view the rule on the Mississippi website.

Missouri

Certification entities can register themselves with the Missouri Board of medicine, after supplying all information listed on following page: Section 334.737.1

ABPM plans to investigate whether submitting an application is an option.


Montana

To ABPM's knowledge, Montana currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Montana, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Nebraska

To ABPM's knowledge, Nebraska currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Nebraska, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Nevada

To ABPM's knowledge, Nevada currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Nevada, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


New Hampshire

To ABPM's knowledge, New Hampshire currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in New Hampshire, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


New Jersey

13:35-6.10 Advertising and solicitation practices

New Jersey specifies the following with regard to advertising and solicitation practices:

(m) Any licensee advertising board certification in a specialty shall possess current certification by a specialty board or certifying entity. Specialty boards recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), and/or the American Podiatric Medicine Association (APMA) shall be approved by the Board and included in a list maintained by the Board. A licensee advertising board certification shall conspicuously specify in the advertisement the specific specialty board or certifying entity granting the certification (for example, the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, the American Board of Radiology, etc.), the national organization recognizing such specialty board or certifying entity (for example, ABMS, AOA, APMA, etc.), if any, and, if not included in the name of the specialty board or certifying entity itself, the field of medical or surgical specialty in which the certification was conferred. Licensees may not hold themselves out as a Board-certified specialist in a particular specialty unless the physician has received formal recognition as a specialist in that specialty from one of the specialty boards listed herein or otherwise approved by the Board. A licensee may not hold himself or herself out as a dermatologist unless he or she is a residency trained dermatologist, having completed a 3-year formal dermatology residency after his or her first year of internship, accredited by the American Board of Medical Specialties ("ABMS") or the American Osteopathic Association ("AOA"), and possesses current specialty certification from the ARMS or AOA. Notwithstanding the foregoing, licensees having formal recognition as a Board-certified dermatologist from the American Board of Certification in Dermatology, or a Board-certified specialist from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, at the time of approval of this amendment (i.e.,______________, 20__) shall be permitted to hold themselves out as a Board certified specialist in their recognized specialty.

If you have any contacts that you believe can be be of assistance in persuading this state to reconsider expanding this definition, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


New Mexico

Pain Relief Act

The New Mexico Pain Relief Act definite a clinical expert as follows:

E. “clinical expert” means a person who by reason of specialized education or substantial relevant experience in pain management has knowledge regarding current standards, practices and guidelines;

It is not clear exactly what ramifications this verbiage could have on ABPM certification, but all physicians approved to take the ABPM Certification Examination have successfully demonstrated both specialized education and substantial relevant experience in pain management.


New York

To ABPM's knowledge, New York currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in New York, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


North Carolina

ABPM is not specifically recognized, but ABPM does meet all of the criteria outlined in the North Carolina Medical Board's Advertising and Publicity Position Statement: 4, 1-7


North Dakota

To ABPM's knowledge, North Dakota currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in North Dakota, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Ohio

Ohio code includes requirements regarding ownership and operation of pain management clinics.  Physician owners must demonstrate certification in pain management or hospice and palliative medicine by the ABMS, AOA BOS, American Board of Pain Medicine or American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians.  There are significant additional requirements for physician owners who cannot demonstrate one of these Board certifications.

Each physician who provides care at a pain management clinic shall hold staff membership at a local hospital with admitting or consulting privileges and meet one of several potential requirements, ABPM certification being one of them.

OAC 4731-29-01 - Standards and procedures for the operation of a pain management clinic


Oklahoma

Oklahoma has an application for individual applicants to have their Board recognized.  ABPM appears to meet all criteria.


Oregon

The Oregon Medical Board has the following statement on advertising:

If a physician represents him/herself as a specialist, he/she must be prepared to demonstrate training or expertise in a legitimate specialty. Successful completion of training recognized as a prerequisite for Board certification in a medical specialty or subspecialty by either the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) or the Advisory Board for Osteopathic Specialists (ABOS) shall be considered adequate. Anything less shall put the burden of proof upon the physician to legitimize the claim. 
If a physician advertises him/herself as being “Board Certified,” he/she must indicate the full name of the certifying board. This statement must contain the term “Not recognized” if the certifying board is not recognized by the ABMS or by the Advisory Board of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA).

http://www.oregon.gov/omb/board/philosophy/Pages/Advertising.aspx

If you have any contacts that you believe can be be of assistance in persuading this state to reconsider expanding this definition, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Pennsylvania

Board certified.--A physician licensed to practice medicine in this Commonwealth who has successfully passed an examination and has maintained certification in the relevant medical specialty or subspecialty area, or both, recognized by one of the following groups:

(i) The American Board of Medical Specialties.
(ii) The American Osteopathic Association.
(iii)The foreign equivalent of either group listed in subparagraph (i) or (ii).

§ 136.2. Definitions.

If you have any contacts that you believe can be be of assistance in persuading this state to reconsider expanding this definition, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Rhode Island

In February 2015, the Rhode Island Board of Medicine officially adopted a new opioid prescribing protocol, which includes ABPM Diplomates in the definition of "pain medicine physician." 

Rules and Regulations for Pain Management, Opioid Use and the Registration of Distributors of Controlled Substances in Rhode Island [R21-28-CSD]


South Carolina

81–96. Office Based Surgery.

a. The specific office-based surgical procedures and anesthesia services that each respective practitioner involved is qualified and competent to perform must be commensurate with each practitioner’s level of training and experience. Criteria to be considered to demonstrate competence include:
(3)(a) For physicians, staff privileges in a hospital to perform the same procedure or service as
that being performed in the office setting or board certification, board eligibility or completion
of a training program in a field of specialization recognized by the ACGME for expertise and
proficiency in that field, or comparable background, formal training, or experience as approved
by the Board. Board certification is understood as American Board of Medical Specialists
(ABMS), American Osteopathic Association (AOA), or equivalent board certification as determined
by the Board.

http://www.scstatehouse.gov/coderegs/Ch%2081.pdf

While they define board certification as ABMS or AOA, they also include "equivalent board certification as determined by the Board".  It is not clear what criteria is used to decide if other boards are equivalent.


South Dakota

To ABPM's knowledge, South Dakota currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in South Dakota, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Tennessee

Tennessee’s Department of Health adopted regulations to improve the care provided in “Pain Management Clinics.”  The regulation outlines the requirements for physicians who serve as medical directors of a clinic, including board certification by the American Board of Pain Medicine.

Within the Tennessee Clinical Practice Guidelines for Management of Chronic Pain, ABPM Diplomates are recognized as Pain Medicine specialists.


Texas

The Texas Board of Medicine carefully reviewed all aspects of ABPM’s rigorous certification process and found them to be “substantially equivalent” to those required of ABMS member boards.  As reflected on the Texas Board of Medicine’s website, Texas Diplomates can convey this well-earned certification to patients and for the purpose of advertising this well-earned credential.


Utah

(1) A physician may not represent to another person that the physician is certified in a medical specialty or certified by a particular board unless: (a) the physician includes in the representation the name of: (i) the certification board or entity; and (ii) the medical specialty for which the physician is certified; and (b) the board or certification entity meets the requirements of Subsection (2). (2) A certification entity or board under Subsection (1) shall meet the following qualifications: (a) be included in the American Board of Medical Specialties or an American Osteopathic Association Certifying Board; or (b) (i) require an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education or American Osteopathic Association approved postgraduate training program that provides complete training in the specialty or subspeciality; and (ii) be certified or had prior certification by the member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties or an American Osteopathic Certifying Board.

58-67-806. Representation of medical specialization.

If you have any contacts that you believe can be be of assistance in persuading this state to reconsider expanding this definition, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Vermont

To ABPM's knowledge, Vermont currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Vermont, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Virginia

Virginia's Advertising ethics code states in part that "D. A licensee shall disclose the complete name of the specialty board that conferred the certification when using or authorizing the use of the term "board certified" or any similar words or phrase calculated to convey the same meaning in any advertising for his practice."

18VAC85-20-30. Advertising ethics


Washington

As of March 2014, the State of Washington officially recognizes ABPM as an approved credentialing board under the state-endorsed definition of “pain medicine specialist.” The Washington State Medical Quality Assurance Commission took this action after reviewing the ABPM’s rigorous credentialing process, including qualifications for Applicants and the administration of ABPM’s certification examination.


West Virginia

West Virginia’s Chronic Pain Clinic Licensing Act established requirements for operating a pain management clinic.  The regulation imposes strict requirements which mandates each pain management clinic shall designate a physician owner who shall practice at the clinic and be responsible for the operation of the clinic.  The designated physician must meet one of the following training requirements: 1) complete a pain medicine fellowship that is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education or such other similar program as may be approved by the secretary; or 2) hold current board certification by the American Board of Pain Medicine or current board certification by the American Board of Anesthesiology or such other board certification as may be approved by the secretary.

http://www.legis.state.wv.us/wvcode/ChapterEntire.cfm?chap=16&art=5H


Wisconsin

Med 10.03 Unprofessional conduct. “Unprofessional conduct” includes the following, or aiding or abetting the same:
(i) Representing or claiming as true the appearance that a physician
possesses a medical specialty certification by a board recognized
certifying organization, such as the American Board of
Medical Specialties, or the American Osteopathic Association, if
it is not true.

If certification with American Board of Pain Medicine is clearly represented, this would not appear to violate this provision, but this is not completely clear.

https://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/code/admin_code/med/10.pdf


Wyoming

To ABPM's knowledge, Wyoming currently does not have any rules or regulations establishing prescribing protocol or defining a pain medicine specialist or standards for pain clinics.

If you believe you can be of assistance with advancing ABPM recognition in Wyoming, please contact the ABPM office at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


ABPM is actively working to add additional states that recognize its credentialing. To help our advocacy effort, see the "State Call to Action" or contact ABPM at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .        

Contact your medical board or state governor to help advocate for ABPM recognition!

Directory of State Medical and Osteopathic Boards                  

Current Governors    

Per Miss. Code Ann. §73-43-11 (1972, as amended). 

Rule 1.15 Pain Management Clinics. 

8.      Training Requirements for All Physicians Practicing in Pain Management Clinics. Effective July 1, 2014, physicians who have not met the qualifications set forth in subsections (1) through (5) below, shall have successfully completed a pain residency fellowship or a pain medicine residency that is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) or the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). All physicians prescribing or dispensing controlled substance medications in pain management clinics registered by the Board must meet one (1) of the following qualifications:

1.      board certification by a specialty board recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) or the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) and hold a subspecialty certification in pain medicine;

2.      board certification by a specialty board recognized by the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists in pain management;

3.      board certification in pain medicine by the American Board of Pain Medicine (ABPM);

4.      successful completion of a residency program in physical medicine and rehabilitation, anesthesiology, neurology, neurosurgery, or psychiatry and approved by the ACGME or the AOA; or

successful completion of 100 hours of in-person, live participatory AMA or AOA Category 1 CME courses in pain management. Upon completion of the 100 hours of CME, physicians must also document completion of 15 hours of live lecture format, Category 1 CME in pain management for every year the physician is practicing pain management